October 2015

 

Houston Invite

If you want to learn how a prevention program can help a law department add value to its company (with metrics), join us in Houston on October 28 at 5:30.  Jeff Carr will present his experience with prevention and the value it creates for law departments and their companies. Details can be found at www.valoremlaw.com.  Remember to RSVP–seats are limited and going fast!

If you can’t join us in Houston, we will be discussing prevention programs in Chicago (November 12) and Palo Alto (November 17).  Details at the Valorem web site (above).

 

UPDATE:  Because of the storms that battered the Houston area over the weekend and the resulting flooding, we are postponing this event.  A new date and time will be posted shortly.

 

 

50% of Americans do not get second opinions for important medical diagnoses.

30% of the time the second opinion causes changes in the diagnosis or treatment.

Do the math.

I don’t know the data on what percentage of in-house lawyers get second opinions about a strategy.  But I bet it’s pretty darn small.  I  have only rarely heard of it being done.

Fresh eyes are often the best eyes.  People trying to solve a problem often lock-in on a strategy and play favorites with it. Fresh eyes can provide needed perspective.

Want an example?  When a company tries a product liability case, the first of many cases to be addressed, who evaluates the trial?  People involved or from the trial firm are not going to cast a critical eye on things if that is the deserved outcome.  And why incur the cost?  Because it is critical to get better in future cases.  Trial performances should be shredded and rebuilt constantly, but they rarely are.

Sad.  A real missed opportunity.

Most people spend their lives trying not to be the Greater Fool. We toss him the hot potato. We dive for his seat when the music stops. The greater fool is someone with the perfect blend of self-delusion and ego to think that he can succeed where others have failed.

This whole country was made by Greater Fools.

Sloan Sabbith, a character on HBO’s Newsroom series

Watch.

Here’s to the Greater Fools among us.  They make us better.

complacency-meaning-definitionI have internal demons. To ease the burden of these demons, I imagine that everybody has their share.  Even if not true, believing it to be makes it easier to accept that I have demons.  But deep down, I know I must fight mine every day.

Every. Single. Day.

My number one demon is complacency. It is a trap for my ego, to believe that I am doing my best, that there is no room for improvement.

When I am candid with myself, I know I can do better than I have before. I know that I have let myself be held back, whether by laziness, fear of change, a desire to appreciate the distance I have traveled or to avoid the hard work that lies ahead.  But when I give into complacency, I stop trying to be better.

Not everyone battles complacency.  Those that do not are trying, every day, to get better.  I know that if I give into complacency, they will pass me by or increase the distance by which they lead me. I hate that.

Each day is a choice.  Do I let complacency win? Or can I be just a little bit better today than I was yesterday. Improvement is a choice. My choice.